New “Training is Everything” videos highlight importance of continued motorcycle training

October 1, 2015

The Washington Motorcycle Safety Program is proud to announce the release of a powerful new public safety video, Training is Everything. This seven minute video, filled with stunning cinematography and powerful interviews, presents a compelling case for all riders to sign up for initial and continued motorcycle training.

The video features motorcycle riders, an elite Army Apache helicopter pilot, champion hydroplane racer Chip Hanauer, rugby players from Seattle Slam, and motorcycle safety specialists. Within it they discuss the importance of training and how the physical and mental skills required to fly combat helicopters, race hydroplanes, and even compete in rugby compare to those required to ride motorcycles.  Pilots, race drivers, and athletes train constantly to be on their game. By doing the same, riders—whether novices or experienced, year-round riders or summer cruisers—can both ride more safely and get more out of themselves and their bikes.

A scene from "Training is Everything." a powerful new public safety video stressing the importance of continued motorcycle training.

A scene from “Training is Everything,” a new public safety video series stressing the importance of continued motorcycle training.

Accompanying the full-length version of the video are two 30-second public service announcements to use as further tools to speak to riders about the main messages of the film—that a large percentage of rider fatalities are, in fact, caused by the riders themselves. By training for the physical and mental art that is motorcycling, riders can get the most from their ride, get home safely, and then go ride more.

Training is Everything, filmed by Twisted Scholar, was made possible through a grant from the Washington Traffic Safety Commission. Training is everything when you fly, when you race, and when you compete, and training is everything when you ride.

*please note: All three videos in the Training is Everything series are featured in the playlist at the top of this post.

Rider’s cross-country trek promoting motorcycle safety reaches Olympia

July 27, 2015
Nate Hudson and DOL Director Pat Kohler holding a copy of the video, "A Second Look," in Olympia on July 23.

Nate Hudson and DOL Director Pat Kohler holding a copy of the video, “A Second Look,” in Olympia on July 23.

Motorcyclist Nate Hudson is logging 17,000 miles during the course of the “Ride for Awareness” campaign, sponsored by Allstate Insurance Company.

On July 23, Hudson’s journey reached Olympia, where he spoke with Department of Licensing Director Pat Kohler.

Hudson praised Washington state’s efforts to protect riders on the roads, including the DOL’s video,  A Second Look.

The video addresses the role of motorists concerning motorcycle safety.

For more information about the Ride for Awareness campaign, visit

And for regular updates on Hudson’s whereabouts as he travels the country, checkout

Washington state to be recognized for its motorcycle safety efforts

July 20, 2015

Photo taken at site of a Motorcycle Skills Test.

A lone motorcycle rider is crossing the country to visit all 50 states to spread awareness about the important role motorists play in protecting motorcycle riders.

Nate Hudson first rode a motorcycle at age 16. That was 20 years–and 200,000 miles–ago.

Hudson’s now about to log 17,000 more miles during the course of the “Ride for Awareness” campaign, sponsored by Allstate Insurance Company.

Hudson will stop in Olympia on Thursday, July 23, to talk about motorcycle safety and promote Washington state’s efforts to protect riders on the roads.

According to the Washington Traffic Safety Commission, there 1,934 motorcycle accidents in 2013, resulting in 73 fatalities. The state reports that in 2013 a motorcyclist was in a crash every four hours.

For more information about the Ride for Awareness campaign, visit

And for regular updates on Hudson’s whereabouts as he travels the country, checkout

The Department of Licensing’s video, A Second Look, directly addresses the role of motorists concerning motorcycle safety.

That video appears below.

Washington CDL holders must soon prove citizenship or permanent residency

June 30, 2015
truck-busOLYMPIA—Starting Sept. 1, 2015, anyone seeking a commercial driver license (CDL) or commercial learner permit (CLP) in Washington will be required to prove they are a United States citizen or lawful permanent resident.
This new law does not affect anyone’s ability to get or retain a regular driver license. Commercial drivers are not required to present this proof until their next CDL or CLP renewal or other transaction that requires a change to their record, including name, address, and endorsement changes.
Drivers with an enhanced personal driver license or enhanced commercial driver license issued in Washington before Sept. 1, 2015, are not required to again prove their lawful permanent residency or U.S. citizenship.
This new requirement is due to the state’s mandatory compliance with federal law and one aspect of a broad public safety effort around CDLs that brings Washington into line with the national standard.
Starting Sept. 1, commercial drivers must visit one of 28 designated offices to complete their CDL or CLP transaction because of the special resources needed to verify documents. The full list of designated office locations can be found at
Commercial drivers should have one of the six approved documents in their possession before arriving at a designated licensing office, including:
·         Valid U.S. Passport or Passport Card issued by the U.S. Department of State;
·         Birth certificate issued by a state or local government. A hospital-issued “Certificate of Live Birth” is not acceptable;
·         Consular Report of Birth Abroad issued by the Department of State;
·         Certificate of Naturalization issued by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services;
·         Certificate of Citizenship issued by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services;
·         Permanent Resident Card or “Green Card” issued by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.
Obtaining duplicate documents can take several weeks. Commercial drivers are encouraged to begin the process immediately if they do not currently have at least one in their possession. Photocopies will not be accepted. The Department of Licensing (DOL) will be unable to complete CDL or CLP transactions of those drivers who are unable to provide one of the approved documents.
Proof of U.S. citizenship or lawful permanent residency is not required to replace a lost, damaged, or stolen card.
More information is available online at or by calling the Washington Department of Licensing Driver Customer Service line at 360-902-3900.

Law designed to reduce abuse of disabled parking takes effect July 1

June 26, 2015

OLYMPIA – Changes to the laws governing special parking privileges for persons with disabilities will take effect July 1 and are aimed at reducing the number of people who abuse disabled parking permits.

Changes include requiring a written prescription from a licensed health care provider to obtain disabled parking privileges and requiring a new application for every renewal. The application also includes a new fraud warning on the application to remind applicants and healthcare providers it is a gross misdemeanor if they knowingly provide false information.
The new laws also extend temporary parking placards from up to six months to up to 12 months and increases the penalty of illegally obtaining a disabled parking placard, license plate, tab, or identification card from a traffic infraction to a misdemeanor.
The changes were recommended by a group formed to develop a plan to eliminate abuse of the program. Participants included Department of Licensing, Department of Health, disabled citizen advocacy groups and local governments. The work group also gathered input from the public.
These changes were included in Engrossed Substitute House Bill 2463 passed by the Legislature in 2014. More information is available at

It’s time to renew: 2015 boat decals expire June 30

June 18, 2015
Everett Marina with Mt. BakerOlympia—Boating season is here, and the deadline for renewing boat and watercraft registration decals is right around the corner. All Washington state boat registrations expire on June 30.
 Don’t let an expired registration spoil your day; remember to renew before you get out on the water.
Boat registrations can be renewed online at the DOL website or in person at a neighborhood vehicle licensing office. Those who choose to renew at an office should make sure to note the registration number on the bow of the boat or watercraft and take that information to the office. 

Full implementation of Wheeled All-terrain Vehicles legislation begins May 18

June 1, 2015

Full implementation of Wheeled All-terrain Vehicles (WATVs) legislation (ESHB 1632) will begin May 18, 2015.

The department has been licensing WATVs through a manual process since October 2013 and began issuing metal tags through a modified manual process in June 2014.

A WATV is –

(a) any motorized nonhighway vehicle with handlebars that is fifty inches or less in width, has a seat height of at least twenty inches, weighs less than one thousand five hundred pounds, and has four tires having a diameter of thirty inches or less; or

(b) a utility-type vehicle designed for and capable of travel over designated roads that travels on four or more low-pressure tires of twenty psi or less, has a maximum width less than seventy-four inches, has a maximum weight less than two thousand pounds, has a wheelbase of one hundred ten inches or less, and satisfies at least one of the following: (i) Has a minimum width of fifty inches; (ii) has a minimum weight of at least nine hundred pounds; or (iii) has a wheelbase of over sixty-one inches.

Unlike off-road vehicles (ORVs), the WATV is identified by a metal tag and tabs. The metal tag will have tabs indicating whether the vehicle is licensed for off-road use or off-road and on-road use.

Metal tags will be mailed from the special license plate unit at the department’s headquarters office. Tabs will be available at any vehicle licensing office, for replacement or renewal.



Before being licensed for on-road use, the WATV must have a safety inspection and VIN verification by a licensed Washington ATV dealer/repair shop and must meet equipment requirements contained in RCW 46.09.457. The WATV owner must provide a signed declaration which also contains a release of liability.

Authorized use 

Licensing the vehicle for on-road use does not qualify the vehicle to travel on any roadway. Users are cautioned to verify where a WATV is authorized to be operated. This can be done by visiting the town, city, or county webpage in which a user wishes to operate the vehicle.

Licensing of the vehicle is not restricted to these areas.


The $18 off-road licensing fee is deposited in the non-highway and off-road vehicle activities program account.

The $12 on-road licensing fee is deposited in the multiuse roadway safety account.


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