Don’t Let a DUI Ruin Your Summer Fun

August 12, 2014

Law Enforcement Will be out in Force on DUI Patrols

field--test-1Summer is a time for parties and picnics in the sun, but don’t let a DUI ruin your fun.  Even though Washington legalized marijuana for adults 21 and older, it is still illegal and dangerous to drive under the influence of marijuana or alcohol.

“Specifically, we want people to know that marijuana doubles the risk of a fatal crash,” said Darrin Grondel, Traffic Safety Commission Director.

“With new retail marijuana stores in the mix, we want to remind the public that prescription and over-the-counter drugs, as well as illegal and recreational drugs, can impair driving ability,” Grondel said.

That is why between August 15 and September 1 extra officers will be on our roads looking for drivers under the influence of alcohol, marijuana, or other drugs during the annual Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign. Many of these officers have special training to identify when a driver is under the influence of drugs as well as alcohol.

Drivers are encouraged to find alternative transportation or ride with a sober designated driver. “More people may be using marijuana recreationally, but that should never be mixed with driving,” said Lt. Rob Sharpe, Commander of the Washington State Patrol Impaired Driving Section.

Lt. Sharpe noted that law enforcement has been arresting drugged drivers for a long time and will continue to identify and arrest drivers who make the poor choice to drive under the influence of marijuana, alcohol, or other drugs.

Additionally, law enforcement reminds young drivers that impairment laws are much stricter for anyone under the age of 21. A young driver who has any marijuana in their system or a blood alcohol concentration of .02 or higher is considered to be driving under the influence and is at risk for arrest.

One hundred and sixty-six law enforcement agencies in Washington have obtained grants to participate in this Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign.  Police departments, sheriff’s offices and the Washington State Patrol will be working together to cover the state in extra DUI enforcement.

All of these extra patrols are part of Target Zero—striving to end traffic deaths and serious injuries in Washington by 2030. For more information, visit www.targetzero.com. Additional information on the Washington Traffic Safety Commission can be found on the website, www.wtsc.wa.gov.

 


Parents say daughter was texting when killed in crash

April 30, 2010

By Mark Horner

In the days that followed a horrific crash on Thurston County’s Littlerock Road in late February, small articles  in local papers reported that 19-year-old Heather Lerch had been speeding when her car struck a guardrail at roughly 60 miles per hour.  The young woman who’d graduated with honors last year from Tumwater High School died instantly.

But there is more to this story.

Having pieced together information from police, the coroner and phone records, Dan and Wendy Lerch say they’re now convinced that their daughter was texting when her car left the road.

“There’s no doubt in my mind.  Texting was 100-percent involved,” Dan Lerch said.

It’s why the Lerch’s have agreed to appear in a Department of Licensing video with a simple message:  Don’t text or do anything else that can distract you while driving. The video (seen below) is about 5 1/2 minutes in length.  A separate 30-second public service announcement also features footage from the video.

The state of Washington is taking aim at distracted drivers.  A new cell phone law goes into effect in June.  It’ll make talking or sending text messages while holding a wireless device a primary traffic offense.

“Pay attention to the road.  Pay attention to your surroundings,” Dan Lerch began.  “Distractions are everywhere from reader boards and signs that flash in front of you on the road to your cell phones and iPods and your buddy asking you, ‘What are you going to do now?’  Is it worth your life?”

That’s the part of the message that lends itself to words.  Losing a child is another matter.

“There are no words, at all,” Wendy Lerch shared.  “It’s a nightmare you keep thinking you’re going to wake up from.”