Permanent registration available for some intermittent-use trailers

September 13, 2017

Have an infrequently used personal trailer weighing 2,000 pounds or less?

Then you might be interested to know about new Washington state law that took effect this year.

That law opened the door for permanent registration options for some vehicles with “intermittent-use” trailer plates.

FAST FACTS

Vehicles with intermittent-use trailer plates:

  • May be used for participation in club activities, exhibitions, tours, parades and occasional pleasure use.
  • May be used for occasional pleasure use.
  • Cannot be held for rent to the public.
  • Cannot be used for commercial or business purposes.
  • Vehicles with these plates must have a scale weight of two thousand pounds or less.
  • You must be a Washington state resident in order to receive “intermittent use” trailer plates.
  • The plates can only be displayed on the vehicle they were purchased for.
  • Must be displayed on the rear of the vehicle.

The initial cost for the standard trailer plate is $20.75

Restored plates have an initial cost of $43.75

Customers pay a onetime registration fee of $187.50 (plus other applicable fees).

The vehicle must also be in good working order.

To learn more about vehicle requirements, applications, and other information, visit the Department of Licensing’s website at dol.wa.gov/vehicleregistration/licenseplates.html.


ADDITIONAL READING

Washington State Laws:

RCW 46.16A.428 Intermittent-use trailers—Permanent registration—Penalty—License plates—Definition—Rules

RCW 46.18.220 Collector vehicle license plates


Drivers need to put down their phones and drive or risk being fined under new law

July 20, 2017

New Distracted Driving Law

Effective July 23, , Washington drivers will not be permitted to hold or operate hand-held electronic devices while they are driving. Use of devices such as cell phones, tablets, video-games and laptops to text, access information, take pictures and talk, even while stopped in traffic, is prohibited under the Driving Under the Influence of Electronics (DUIE) Act. “Hands-free” devices such as mounted dashboard screens and Bluetooth can be used legally, but only with a single touch to start use.

*Exemptions include drivers using a personal electronic device to contact emergency services; certain transit employees and commercial drivers (within the scope of their employment) and drivers operating authorized emergency vehicles.

In the U.S., distracted driving caused 3,477 traffic deaths in 2015, a 9 percent increase from the year before, and “a deadly epidemic,” according to the National Safety Council. According to the Washington Traffic Safety Commission (WTSC), 71 percent of distracted drivers are engaging in the most dangerous distraction, using their cell phones behind the wheel. The new law in Washington is part of Target Zero, a statewide initiative to reduce traffic fatalities and serious injuries on Washington’s roadways to zero by the year 2030.

Currently, texting or holding a cellphone to the ear while driving carries a fine of $124 in Washington State. Starting July 23, using a hand-held device while driving will be considered a primary offense and law enforcement will be issuing fines $136-$234 to violators. In addition, a citation will be added to your driving record and reported to insurance providers. You can also receive a $99 ticket for other types of distractions such as grooming, smoking, eating, or reading if the activity interferes with safe driving, and you are pulled over for another traffic offense.

The WTSC recommends the following tips for complying with the new law:

  1. Turn off your phone and put it in the glove box
  2. If you’re a passenger, hold the driver’s phone
  3. Don’t text or call a friend or loved one if you know they are driving
  4. If using GPS on your phone, plug in the address before you start the car and use a mounted phone holder
  5. Talk to family members (especially teen drivers) about the risks of cell phone use. Model responsible behavior by not using your phone while in the car

For more information about the new law visit http://www.wadrivetozero.com/distracted-driving.


New law gives Washington more time for federal ID requirement changes

May 18, 2017

Gov. Jay Inslee signed into law this week a measure that brings Washington state into compliance with the federal REAL ID Act, giving residents likely until 2020 before the new federal ID requirements will affect travelers with a Washington driver license or ID card and those seeking entry into some federal facilities and military bases.

That’s because the new law is expected to gain our state a REAL ID compliance extension that will allow a standard Washington driver license or ID card to be used for all federal purposes, including boarding commercial flights until then. Washington joins the ranks of about 20 other states with compliance extensions while they work to implement the federally-mandated changes.

Enhanced Driver Licenses and ID cards will become Washington state’s federally-compliant ID document for domestic air travel and entry into secure areas of federal facilities, but it’s important to remember there are other types of documents that are already valid for federal purposes now and into the future. You may already have one: U.S. or foreign passports, U.S. Passport Cards, military ID, permanent resident cards, Transportation Worker Identification Credential (TWIC card), and several other documents. A complete list is available here.

The new law also lowers the price of state-issued Enhanced Driver Licenses from $108 to $78 starting in late July.

Washington state is currently under a temporary compliance extension and federal officials were provided a formal request for a compliance extension this week after Gov. Inslee signed the legislation into law.


Law designed to reduce abuse of disabled parking takes effect July 1

June 26, 2015

OLYMPIA – Changes to the laws governing special parking privileges for persons with disabilities will take effect July 1 and are aimed at reducing the number of people who abuse disabled parking permits.

 
Changes include requiring a written prescription from a licensed health care provider to obtain disabled parking privileges and requiring a new application for every renewal. The application also includes a new fraud warning on the application to remind applicants and healthcare providers it is a gross misdemeanor if they knowingly provide false information.
 
The new laws also extend temporary parking placards from up to six months to up to 12 months and increases the penalty of illegally obtaining a disabled parking placard, license plate, tab, or identification card from a traffic infraction to a misdemeanor.
 
The changes were recommended by a group formed to develop a plan to eliminate abuse of the program. Participants included Department of Licensing, Department of Health, disabled citizen advocacy groups and local governments. The work group also gathered input from the public.
 
These changes were included in Engrossed Substitute House Bill 2463 passed by the Legislature in 2014. More information is available at dol.wa.gov.