Updated Motorcycle Operator Manual now available online in English and Spanish

January 8, 2020

Washington Motorcycle Operator ManualWhether you’re thinking about getting a two- or three-wheel motorcycle or you simply want to brush up on riding laws and best practices, the Washington Motorcycle Operator Manual is a great resource.

The newly updated manual is now available online in both English and Spanish. It can be read there, downloaded, and printed. An English-language hard copy can be obtained at any licensing service office, with Spanish versions in production and arriving soon.

The new and improved guide includes information about the new permit and endorsement process, new liability insurance requirements, and much more. It’s everything riders and prospective riders need to know about safely and legally operating a motorcycle on Washington state roads.

The Motorcycle Operator Manual features information provided by National Public Services Research Institute (NPSRI), the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), the Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF), Evergreen Safety Council (ESC), and the American Association of Vehicle Administrators (AAMVA).

For more information on endorsement and permit fees, motorcycle laws, or to find a training/testing provider, visit dol.wa.gov.


2-wheel motorcycle permit and endorsement processes will change on Jan. 1, 2020

November 1, 2019

motorcycleAs part of a broader effort to reduce serious crashes and fatalities on Washington’s roadways, the state is changing its requirements for getting a 2-wheel permit or endorsement.

Starting Jan. 1, 2020, motorcyclists seeking a permit will need to pass a basic knowledge and skills exam. They must pass a more advanced knowledge and skills exam for an endorsement.

Currently, motorcyclists must pass only a basic knowledge exam and skills test for an endorsement.

Also on Jan. 1, the penalty for riding without an endorsement will increase from $136 to $386. The average cost for a motorcycle safety course to obtain an endorsement is $200.

Motorcyclists represent a disproportionately high percentage of fatal and serious injury crashes. Switching to a more comprehensive exam process is in line with Gov. Jay Inslee’s Target Zero goal of reducing serious motor vehicle crashes and fatalities to zero by 2030.

Frequently asked questions about the law changes:

What must I do if I already have a motorcycle permit?

Individuals who already have a permit can take either a training course or a skills test before Dec. 31, 2019, to obtain a 2-wheel endorsement. See approved motorcycle training schools.

What must I do if I already have an endorsement?

Nothing. You’re all set.

What if I have taken a motorcycle knowledge test but I do not have a motorcycle permit?

If you want a motorcycle permit, you must visit a licensing service office to add it to your driver license. If you want a 2-wheel endorsement, you must pass a skills test. After that, you must visit a licensing office by Dec. 31, 2019 to add the endorsement.

What do I need to do if I already have a motorcycle permit but I did not get my endorsement by Dec. 31?

As long as your permit is still valid, take the 2-wheel endorsement-level knowledge test and a 2-wheel endorsement-level skills test. After passing both, visit a licensing office to add an endorsement to your driver license.

Am I able to renew my permit?

You can renew your permit once after Jan. 1, 2020.

What if my permit has expired?

You must start the process again. After Jan. 1, 2020, you must take a permit-level knowledge test and a permit-level skills test if your permit is expired.

What if I am under 18 years old?

If you are under 18, you must complete an approved motorcycle safety course before applying for an endorsement.

What if I want a sidecar/trike permit or endorsement?

The new law is specific to 2-wheel motorcycles. You will need to take a 3-wheel motorcycle training course or take the 3-wheel knowledge and skills tests. See approved trike/sidecar schools.


Still looking for a New Year’s resolution? Consider checking your vehicle for open recalls

January 3, 2018

Become a safer driver in just a few minutes by visiting  http://www.checktoprotect.org/#/, to conduct a fast, free search for open recalls on your car. By entering a vehicle’s year, Identification Number (VIN), make and model you cVehicle an access a list of potential open recalls. The VIN can be found in the lower left corner of a car’s windshield or on the inside of the driver-side door, or on your vehicle’s registration card and possibly on insurance documentation.

Drivers who have open recalls on their vehicles can visit a local authorized dealership to have them repaired for free.

Check To Protect is a national campaign designed to encourage drivers to search the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA’s) open recall database by educating drivers about the staggering number of vehicles with unrepaired recalls and underscores the need to promptly fix recalls once drivers become aware of them.

According to NHTSA, there are more than 53 million—or more than one in four—vehicles on the road with unresolved safety recalls. Neglecting recalls could lead to costly vehicle damage and can jeopardize the safety of motorists on the roads.

Launched in June by the National Safety Council (NSC) and founding coalition member, FCA US, Check To Protect focuses on informing all motorists of the online tool, particularly owners of older and used vehicles.

According to the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers and Global Automakers, the recall compliance rate for vehicles up to four years old is 83 percent; the rate decreases significantly to 44 percent for vehicles five to 10 years old. The drop in compliance is attributed to the difficultly in tracking owners of older and used vehicles. Since drivers expect to receive alerts about recalls, they do not tend to check for themselves.

The NSC (nsc.org) is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to eliminate preventable deaths at work, in homes and communities, and on the road through leadership, research, education and advocacy. Founded in 1913 and chartered by Congress, NSC advances this mission by partnering with businesses, government agencies, elected officials and the public in areas where they can make the most impact.



Off road motorcycles not legal for street use; some registrations being canceled

September 1, 2010

 DOL recently learned about a procedural issue that allowed the owners of some off-road motorcycles to register them for use on public roadways. State and federal laws prohibit vehicles manufactured specifically for off-road use from being licensed and registered for use on public streets.

Off-road motorcycles and other types of off-road vehicles can be registered with DOL as off-road vehicles and are eligible for off-road vehicle permits. These permits allow use the use of these vehicles for recreational purposes on public land, but not on public roads.

DOL is working to cancel license plates and motorcycle registrations issued to the owners of off-road motorcycles. These individuals will receive new off-road vehicle registrations and an off-road vehicle permit.

Click here for detailed questions and answers about this issue.