New web tool helps consumers identify vehicle safety recalls

December 5, 2016

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports that vehicle recalls are at an all-time high, meaning millions of unfixed and unsafe vehicles are on the road.

NHTSA’s new online search tool lets you enter a Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) to quickly learn if a specific vehicle has not been repaired as part of a safety recall in the last 15 years.

You can find NHTSA’s new VIN search tool at www.safercar.gov/VIN.

NHTSA stresses that vehicles in need of safety-related repairs should be fixed as soon as possible, and that doing so could save lives.


Protecting Teen Drivers with 5 simple rules

October 16, 2015

5-to-drive-1National Teen Driver Safety Week is Oct. 18-24, and the Washington State Patrol, Washington Traffic Safety Commission, numerous partners around the state, and the Department of Licensing want to encourage parents to use the “5 to Drive” rules to talk to their teen drivers about safety on the road.

Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death for teens and young adults. In 2014, there were 530 serious injury crashes and 147 fatalities among Washington drivers between the ages of 16 and 25.

“Young drivers need extra support and parents can help reduce the risk of a crash by insisting teens follow our state’s intermediate driver licensing requirements and insisting on safe driving behavior,” said Pat Kohler, DOL Director. “We’re promoting the ‘5 to Drive’ rules as a simple, common sense way parents can keep teen drivers safe.”

Parents can easily ask their teens to agree to the following “5 to Drive” rules before handing over their car keys:

“Distracted and impaired driving can be prevented,” said Washington State Patrol Chief John R. Batiste. “This is an opportunity for parents to act as positive role models and talk to their teenagers about these simple steps to prevent tragedies before they occur.”

For more information about Teen Driver Safety Week and the “5 to Drive” campaign, please visit the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration website at: www.safercar.gov/parents. It has detailed information and statistics, and informative videos designed to help save the lives of teen drivers.

The video below is from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s YouTube channel. This video shows us why it’s important for parents to talk to their teens about this important issue.


Wearing an illegal motorcycle helmet could come at a price

March 14, 2010

by Kyle McCarty

Do you know about the change in Washington’s motorcycle helmet law that went into effect last year?  If not, be advised:  Wearing an illegal helmet may not only compromise your safety, it could also take a chunk out of your wallet.

The ticket for wearing an illegal helmet?  $124.

Aiming to reduce the number of fatalities among motorcyclists, the Washington State Patrol is looking for riders wearing illegal helmets.

Helmet laws have been created to increase the safety of motorcycle riders and passengers. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, fatal motorcycle crashes have risen 50-percent since the late ’90s.

The “DOT” seal of approval is something to look for when shopping for motorcycle helmets.  Not all helmets have one.  A helmet with a DOT symbol means you have a high-quality motorcycle helmet that complies with US Department of Transportation construction standards.

On July 26th, 2009, Washington state revised its helmet law to reflect the federal motor vehicle standardWashington’s law now includes the following:

For purposes of this section, “motorcycle helmet” means a protective covering for the head consisting of a hard outer shell, padding adjacent to and inside the outer shell, and a neck or chin strap type retention system, with the manufacturer’s certification applied in accordance with 49 C.F.R. Sec. 571.218 indicating that the motorcycle helmet meets standards established by the United States department of transportation.

Simply stated, DOT helmets are much safer than novelty helmets.  Think you know the differences between a DOT helmet and a novelty one?  Check-out this pamphlet (pdf / 3.9 MB) to make certain that you do.  After all, it might not only save you money.  It could save your life.

For more information about this important topic, please click here.